7.7.1 breaks Edit > Line Operations > Sort Lines As Integers Ascending for CIDR IPv4



  • @piranpiran said:

    unordered ASN data list is REALLY BIG

    So what? The subset of data you showed us above (which is a measely 13 lines) does show the bug; that would have been sufficient. You just needed three copies: one in completely unsorted, one in v7.7 sorted, and one in v7.7.1 wrongly-sorted; Alan wished (after the fact) for you to have originally posted all three of those here, which would have made your question easier to understand; and I explicitly suggested you include that in the official bug report, which you apparently ignored.

    As it is, without even a link to this thread, there’s no reason for anyone there to believe that there’s a problem, because in the issue page, you don’t show any evidence of the issue, or a data set that will reproduce it, and your description of the issue is not sufficient to reproduce it. It boggles me that someone would go to more effort here to ask for help then when they do the official issue reporting, where something can be done about it.

    @Alan-Kilborn:

    Oh, wait…you are giving what 7.7.1 outputs, not what you want. I wish you’d given both (I’m too lazy to try an earlier version…for a problem specific to you). :)
    Edit: No, that doesn’t make sense either!!!

    Once I saw that the posted data was partially sorted – ie, sorted by the first octet, but didn’t sort on the second octet or beyond – and once I confirmed that if I threw that partially-sorted data into my 7.7, it finished sorting by the additional octets (which was the goal, from what I understood), I just assumed that randomly-ordered data in v7.7.1 would sort to the order that was originally posted; I haven’t confirmed that yet myself. (I haven’t yet taken the opportunity to download a copy of v7.7.1… I guess I’ll have to do that at some point.)



  • @Alan-Kilborn said:

    you should add a link to this thread from the issue.

    Oh, good, looks like it just happened. Thank you, @piranpiran : I had been boggled by your more recent posts there and here, and was starting to be disappointed, but that disappointment is fading now. Hopefully, you’ll take to heart the comments about showing all three sets of data in the issue, too.



  • @Alan-Kilborn
    Thank you for that helpful consideration.

    @PeterJones
    The before data is HUGE. Providing it is likely to cause confusion… I do not see npp’s lead programmer being confused with my description …should a fix be on the repair roadmap. Link to the (huge) raw ASN file:
    https://www.robtex.com/as/AS38895.html



  • @piranpiran said:

    The before data is HUGE. Providing it is likely to cause confusion…

    No, valid before data is a completely-unsorted version of the 13 lines you’ve already pasted – if necessary, just manually cut a few lines and move them around. That’s not huge, that’s 13 lines.



  • @piranpiran

    In computer science, when reporting bugs, it is customary to reduce a large dataset down to a sample that is just big enough to fully illustrate an issue. That’s all that was meant. Ideally, you should take a subset of the huge data and show it the 3 ways requested.



  • @PeterJones said:

    Hopefully, you’ll take to heart the comments about showing all three sets of data in the issue, too.

    Programmers tend to like short & sweet - avoids the dreaded TL;DR :-)





  • @piranpiran said:

    Programmers tend to like short & sweet - avoids the dreaded TL;DR :-)

    In what world is 13 lines of data TL;DR?

    Unsorted:

    13.228.0.0/15 REACH
    15.177.48.0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
    18.140.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    35.154.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    13.228.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.138.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.142.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    13.250.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    18.136.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    

    Sorted as integers in v7.7 (desired behavior)

    13.228.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    13.228.0.0/15 REACH
    13.250.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    15.177.48.0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
    18.136.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB         HERE in v7.7, 136 came before 138, as desired
    18.138.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.140.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.142.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    35.154.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    

    Sorted as inters in v7.7.1 (unwanted behavior)

    13.228.0.0/15 REACH
    13.228.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    13.250.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    15.177.48.0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
    18.140.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.138.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.142.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.136.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB		THIS ONE IS SORTED WRONG IN v7.7.1
    35.154.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    

    See how simple that was? A short set of data that completely shows the bug you are reporting.

    I even gave it to you for free. Hopefully, you’ll copy/paste this into the github issue.



  • @PeterJones

    • Unsorted para confuses me. It’s not what I do or did or even want to do.

    • Sorted as integers para is unavailable to me as I don’t have 7.7 any more.

    • Sorted as inters [sic] para is another way of putting my original premis. Its last line is incorrectly ordered.

    I chose to put my difficulty into words within my ‘heads-up’ bug report. Also I pointed out exactly where it’s going wrong too.

    Thank you for your opinion …which I fully respect. I need to go away and fix my own server’s anti-spammer dragon which I can see is currently tying up your outfit’s notifications delivery server. That whitelisting activity necessarily takes the server offline for a while so please don’t take offence.



  • @piranpiran said:

    Unsorted para confuses me. It’s not what I do or did or even want to do.

    So take a step back here: I believe there are really two activities going on simultaneously, which you need to separate in your mind. 1) You have a complicated, huge set of data which you want to sort. 2) You’ve found a bug in the sorting algorithm, which the 13 lines of data evidence.

    For #1: Until the bug is fixed, or unless you revert to v7.7, you are not going to get your actual huge data sorted. If you need that done quickly, go download v7.7 and run using that (if you don’t want to uninstall v7.7.1, then you can download the portable “zip” version, and export to a folder (on your desktop or similar) and run from there to get your task done. Thus, ignore #1 for now

    So, on to #2: accurately and helpfully reporting the bug. To do that in an unconfusing manner, you need to supply a small set of unsorted data which will give the different results depending on whether it’s in v7.7 or v7.7.1. The thirteen lines I showed in “unsorted” is just such a set. Of course you don’t want this data in this order: this is just a starting point that will show the bug. At this point, remember, all we’re considering is the bug itself, not whether the data matches your full data set. Of course it’s not properly sorted: you need to start with unsorted data to show a bug in a sorting algorithm. Of course it doesn’t have all the extra data in your original data: it’s a short, self-contained data set that shows all the issues with little extraneous information.

    Sorted as integers para is unavailable to me as I don’t have 7.7 any more.

    And I’ve kindly given you the result of sorting in v7.7. So you don’t need v7.7… though you could grab as easily as I grabbed v7.7.1 portable/zip to be able to confirm the v7.7.1 sort-order after my last post.

    Sorted as inters [sic] para is another way of putting my original premis.

    Sorry for the typo; I meant “Sorted as inters in v7.7.1 (unwanted behavior)”, of course. And that paragraph was meant to match your original problem statement. Note that in your github issue, you didn’t even give that much information, which was one of my points to you.

    Its last line is incorrectly ordered.

    Yep, the unsorted data shows the bug in more than one location. I just highlighted the first one I noticed.

    Also I pointed out exactly where it’s going wrong too.

    Except you had no data; you didn’t show what you started with, what you expected, or what you were wrongly getting. You gave some words with jargon/abbreviations. Not all programmers deal with “CIDR” or “raw ASN listing”, and so you may be asking them to go look up what those terms are, which seems less helpful than supplying the 13 lines of data that you originally posted here (or the three sets of 13 lines which truly show the whole issue, unsorted, wrongly sorted, and desired sort order); not all software development teams handling bug reports want to come up with their own data set which may or may not evidence the bug being reported, when it would be so much simpler if the person reporting the bug also included data.

    I need to go away and fix …

    Good luck.



  • @chcg said:

    Maybe https://github.com/notepad-plus-plus/notepad-plus-plus/commit/ff20c264df4167943fff6247fec4b0c0ce6227fb#diff-4608be755b00f4ec444233203ee8eafc changed the behaviour as it is a change to the sorting introduced from 7.7 -> 7.7.1.

    Good point.

    [18446744073709551615] :: http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/climits/
    “ULLONG_MAX - Maximum value for an object of type unsigned long long int - 18446744073709551615 ((2 to the 64) -1) or greater”
    OK, a big number …issue may depend on how IPv4 octet max 255.255.255.255 is now being interpreted or parsed?

    [7.7.1 change notes] :: “Fix crash while sorting lines with numbers longer than 20 digits” :: I’ve used the ‘previous’ sort mechanism in npp intensively daily for months. No crashes. Sort is reliable & quick. System copes. Something else in 7.7.1 changed or is flawed?



  • @piranpiran said:

    Fix crash while sorting lines with numbers longer than 20 digits

    Apparently someone noticed a problem with really long (as in digits) numbers and an attempt was made to fix that. A side effect was that it broke the undocumented behavior you were used to. It remains to be seen if the developers think your desired undocumented behavior is worth bringing back.



  • Too tired now. The workaround I suggested in the bug site thread did not satisfy at all times. I tried to edit it to no avail. Then I hit its preview delete button and now the whole bug report thread has been deleted or is unavailable (possibly another dragon). If a mod can restore the bug report then good otherwise I’ll have to try and retrace steps after some decent sleep. If anyone’s interested. Seems like a minority vertical issue and it’s just me reporting:-/ g’night



  • Hello, @piranpiran, and All,

    As I’ve verified that lexicographically sort is NOT broken in the v7.7.1 release, and acts exactly like the prior releases, you could use a regex S/R which would change the IPV4 addresses in such a way that a lexicographically sort would be possible !!

    Let’s have a try on your small sample text, below, pasted in a new N++ tab :

    13.228.0.0/15 REACH
    15.177.48.0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
    18.140.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    35.154.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    13.228.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.138.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.142.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    13.250.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    18.136.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    

    Open the Replace dialog ( Ctrl + H )

    • SEARCH \b(((\d)?\d)?\d)(?=\.|/)

    • REPLACE (?2(?3:\x20):\x20\x20)\1

    • Tick, preferably, the Wrap around option

    • Select the Regular expression search mode

    • Click on the Replace All button

    Et voilà ! You should get the following text :

     13.228.  0.  0/15 REACH
     15.177. 48.  0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
     18.140.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     35.154.  0.  0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
     43.250.192.  0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
     13.228.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     18.138.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     18.142.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     43.250.193.  0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
     13.250.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     43.250.193.  0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
     18.136.  0.  0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     43.250.192.  0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    

    This regex adds the appropriate number of space character(s) to any number, before the / symbol, containing from 1 to 3 digits, in order to align the four blocks of an IPV4 address ;-))

    Now, after using the Edit > Line Operations > Sort lines Lexicographically Ascending menu option, you should be left with your expected sort :

     13.228.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     13.228.  0.  0/15 REACH
     13.250.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     15.177. 48.  0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
     18.136.  0.  0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     18.138.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     18.140.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     18.142.  0.  0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
     35.154.  0.  0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
     43.250.192.  0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
     43.250.192.  0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
     43.250.193.  0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
     43.250.193.  0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    

    Finally, to get the initial layout of your IPV4 list, use the simple regex S/R, below :

    SEARCH (?-s)\x20+(?=.*/)

    REPLACE Leave EMPTY

    Here we are !

    13.228.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    13.228.0.0/15 REACH
    13.250.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    15.177.48.0/21 Amazon ROUTE53
    18.136.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.138.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.140.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    18.142.0.0/15 Amazon EC2 SIN prefix source:RADB
    35.154.0.0/16 Amazon EC2 BOM prefix source:RADB
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.192.0/24 Amazon SIN prefix source:RADB
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon Asia-Pacific Resources
    43.250.193.0/24 Amazon SIN Prefix source:RADB
    

    This second regex searches for any non-null amount of space characters, located before the / symbol and delete them, as the replacement zone is Empty

    I just hope that these two regex S/R work nice, too, on your VERY BIG unordered ASN data list ;-))

    Best Regards,

    guy038



  • @piranpiran The dragon is slayed. Rest easy. PR#5843 😛



  • I’d suggest that the OP test the process put forward by @guy038 and, if it validates, record these actions into a macro for future use. As long as the sort algorithm in N++ 7.7.1 sorts true integers correctly, I say there is no bug and the code should be left alone.

    The dragon is slayed. Rest easy PR#5843

    Not sure there was a dragon to slay, other than the posting dragon for those with reputation < 2. :)



  • @Alan-Kilborn False. No matter what there’s a dragon to slay here. Re-check PR#5843 to see why the v7.7.1 setup is a complete mess. I’ve added more information to it.



  • @guy038 Very thoughtful, thank you for that work and I commend your positive attitude. I have never actually used the lexicographic option before now. The integer option, as it behaved prior to 7.7.1, ‘just worked’ - brilliantly effectively and blindingly quickly - with nary a crash despite the apparent citation in 7.7.1 change notes.



  • @guy038 said:

    I just hope that these two regex S/R work nice, too, on your VERY BIG unordered ASN data list ;-))

    Long time ago I used to throw a dozen or so S/R (?Scintilla?) keyboard macros at this situation. Quite buggy in their own right. Very slow and held up my workstation for minutes on end prompting Windows to pale out the screen and issue a soft-crash notification (which I learnt to ignore and just allow it all to finish properly IDC).

    The ASN listing cited earlier is not particularly long compared with some of them out there which are truly monumentally sized. The S/R times became unreasonable to, frankly, largely risible. Complicated too.

    Then I discovered the sort option behaviour cited by this thread… so quick, so simple, so WOW:-0

    I am therefore loathe to go back to needing to use S/R hacks. If this issue cannot be resolved or worked around I very much think that I will need to adopt an earlier suggestion from @PeterJones to download the earlier ZIP and keep it on hand just to do the sorting. I had not known that this was feasible.



  • @guy038 You want a big unordered ASN listing? In my best Crocodile Dundee voice: THIS is a BIG one:
    https://www.robtex.com/as/AS7552.html


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