delete both duplicates regexp macro?





  • @patrickdrd
    that’s the regex I meant. Well if it’s found 3 then at least it works. If you are able to figure out the other 4 lines (you expected to get), then I’d suggest making a new file, copying those 4 lines, and their ‘duplicates’ from the second file and comparing them. To make it easier to compare, use the Show Symbol (under main menu View option). You can select all, or possibly just some of the options. Put 1 line from first file directly above it’s ‘duplicate’ from the second. I bet you will find a difference. It may only be a space, or possibly a tab in one vs a number of spaces in the other line, but there will be a difference.

    As for different bookmark colors, I know it can be done as @Scott_Sumner mentioned it recently, or rather he mentioned a different icon, so presumably a different colour is also possible. I suggest have a look through his posts. This can be done by selecting a poster (their name in blue), then in their profile page the right hand side lists posts going backwards in time, last at the top.

    It’s bed time for me. Likely someone else will respond overnight if you are still having issues.

    Good luck

    Terry



  • this regexp is doing the job fine:

    (?-s)^(.+)\R(?s)(?=.*\R\1\R?)

    but as guy said, it doesn’t work with large (or kind of) files,
    my file is 1-1,5mb (a bit over 50k records) and it doesn’t work

    anyway, I did it with excel vlookup function



  • Hi, All

    Unfortunately, again, I verified that my previous method works, only, if file contents and/or number of lines processed are not too important :-(( In most cases, the regex engine ends up , matching, wrongly, all file contents. Too bad !

    So, if you wish to keep the initial order of your file, here is, a new method to adopt, which covers all cases ( I hope so ! ), in order to keep/delete duplicate lines AND/OR all non-duplicate lines of a file, whatever its size !

    Please, do any test, even on mportant files to verify that this method is robust and does not fail ! I’ll be glad to get your feedback :-))


    So, let’s start with that sample text :

    567890
    1234
    45
    1234
    xyz
    567890
    567890
    000000000
    567890
    45
    abcdef
    1234
    1234
    45
    hijk
    45
    45
    567890
    1234
    999
    1234
    
    • Move the cursor at the beginning of the first item 567890

    • Open the Column editor ( Edit > Column Editor... )

    • Insert a decimal sequence of numbers, ticking the Leading zeros option

    • Delete the last isolated number 22

    =>

    01567890
    021234
    0345
    041234
    05xyz
    06567890
    07567890
    08000000000
    09567890
    1045
    11abcdef
    121234
    131234
    1445
    15hijk
    1645
    1745
    18567890
    191234
    20999
    211234
    
    • Now, use the regex S/R, below, to swap the positions of data and numbers, where N is the number of digits, of the previous numbering, and to insert of a separation character ( I chose the # character, but any individual char may suit, providing it’s not used in your data. Prefer a character which is not a meta-character used in regexes ! )

      • SEARCH ^(?-s)^(\d{N})(.+)

      • REPLACE \2#\1

    As, in our example, N = 2, it leads to the text :

    567890#01
    1234#02
    45#03
    1234#04
    xyz#05
    567890#06
    567890#07
    000000000#08
    567890#09
    45#10
    abcdef#11
    1234#12
    1234#13
    45#14
    hijk#15
    45#16
    45#17
    567890#18
    1234#19
    999#20
    1234#21
    
    • Then, execute a sort with the menu option Edit > Line Operations > Sort Lines Lexicographically Ascending =>
    000000000#08
    1234#02
    1234#04
    1234#12
    1234#13
    1234#19
    1234#21
    45#03
    45#10
    45#14
    45#16
    45#17
    567890#01
    567890#06
    567890#07
    567890#09
    567890#18
    999#20
    abcdef#11
    hijk#15
    xyz#05
    

    Important : Till the end of that post, this sorted text becomes the new sample text !


    Now, here are the six regex S/R that cover all possible cases :

    • Regex A : SEARCH (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(?:\1.*\R)+ and REPLACE Leave EMPTY

    • Regex B : SEARCH (?-s)^((.+#).*\R)(?:\2.*\R)+ and REPLACE \1

    • Regex C : SEARCH (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(\1.*\R)+ and REPLACE \2

    • Regex D : SEARCH (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(?:\1.*\R)+|.+\R and REPLACE ?1$0

    • Regex E : SEARCH (?-s)^((.+#).*\R)(?:\2.*\R)+|.+\R and REPLACE \1

    • Regex F : SEARCH (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(\1.*\R)+|.+\R and REPLACE \2


    So, in a previously sorted file ( I insist ! ) and whatever the numbering after the # symbol :

    • If you want to delete all duplicate lines, only, use the regex A

    • If you want to keep isolated lines AND the first line of each block of duplicate lines, only, use the regex B

    • If you want to keep isolated lines AND the last line of each block of duplicate lines, only, use the regex C

    • If you want to delete isolated lines, only, use the regex D

    • If you want to keep the first line of each block of duplicate lines, only, use the regex E

    • If you want to keep the last line of each block of duplicate lines, only, use the regex F

    Here are, below, the results of these six regex S/R, against the sample text :

    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |    Regex A     |    Regex B     |    Regex C     |    Regex D     |    Regex E     |    Regex F     |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |  000000000#08  |  000000000#08  |  000000000#08  |  1234#02       |  1234#02       |  1234#21       |
    |  999#20        |  1234#02       |  1234#21       |  1234#04       |  45#03         |  45#17         |
    |  abcdef#11     |  45#03         |  45#17         |  1234#12       |  567890#01     |  567890#18     |
    |  hijk#15       |  567890#01     |  567890#18     |  1234#13       |                |                |
    |  xyz#05        |  999#20        |  999#20        |  1234#19       |                |                |
    |                |  abcdef#11     |  abcdef#11     |  45#03         |                |                |
    |                |  hijk#15       |  hijk#15       |  45#10         |                |                |
    |                |  xyz#05        |  xyz#05        |  45#14         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  45#16         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  567890#01     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  567890#06     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  567890#07     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  567890#09     |                |                |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    

    • Now, considering any of these 6 results, just above, let’s swap, with the regex S/R, below, the two blocks of data, on either side of the # character

      • SEARCH ^(?-s)^(.+)#(.+)

      • REPLACE \2#\1

    We get the different cases, below :

    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |    Regex A     |    Regex B     |    Regex C     |    Regex D     |    Regex E     |    Regex F     |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |  08#000000000  |  08#000000000  |  08#000000000  |  02#1234       |  02#1234       |  21#1234       |
    |  20#999        |  02#1234       |  21#1234       |  04#1234       |  03#45         |  17#45         |
    |  11#abcdef     |  03#45         |  17#45         |  12#1234       |  01#567890     |  18#567890     |
    |  15#hijk       |  01#567890     |  18#567890     |  13#1234       |                |                |
    |  05#xyz        |  20#999        |  20#999        |  19#1234       |                |                |
    |                |  11#abcdef     |  11#abcdef     |  03#45         |                |                |
    |                |  15#hijk       |  15#hijk       |  10#45         |                |                |
    |                |  05#xyz        |  05#xyz        |  14#45         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  16#45         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  01#567890     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  06#567890     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  07#567890     |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  09#567890     |                |                |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    
    • Considering any of these 6 results, just above, perform, again, a sort, with the option Edit > Line Operations > Sort Lines Lexicographically Ascending =>
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |    Regex A     |    Regex B     |    Regex C     |    Regex D     |    Regex E     |    Regex F     |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |  05#xyz        |  01#567890     |  05#xyz        |  01#567890     |  01#567890     |  17#45         |
    |  08#000000000  |  02#1234       |  08#000000000  |  02#1234       |  02#1234       |  18#567890     |
    |  11#abcdef     |  03#45         |  11#abcdef     |  03#45         |  03#45         |  21#1234       |
    |  15#hijk       |  05#xyz        |  15#hijk       |  04#1234       |                |                |
    |  20#999        |  08#000000000  |  17#45         |  06#567890     |                |                |
    |                |  11#abcdef     |  18#567890     |  07#567890     |                |                |
    |                |  15#hijk       |  20#999        |  09#567890     |                |                |
    |                |  20#999        |  21#1234       |  10#45         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  12#1234       |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  13#1234       |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  14#45         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  16#45         |                |                |
    |                |                |                |  19#1234       |                |                |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    
    • Finally, let’s use this last regex S/R to get rid of all the counting marks

      • SEARCH (?-s)^.+#

      • REPLACE Leave Empty

    We obtain the 6 final results, from the original text :

    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |    Regex A     |    Regex B     |    Regex C     |    Regex D     |    Regex E     |    Regex F     |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    |    xyz         |    567890      |    xyz         |    567890      |    567890      |    45          |
    |    000000000   |    1234        |    000000000   |    1234        |    1234        |    567890      |
    |    abcdef      |    45          |    abcdef      |    45          |    45          |    1234        |
    |    hijk        |    xyz         |    hijk        |    1234        |                |                |
    |    999         |    000000000   |    45          |    567890      |                |                |
    |                |    abcdef      |    567890      |    567890      |                |                |
    |                |    hijk        |    999         |    567890      |                |                |
    |                |    999         |    1234        |    45          |                |                |
    |                |                |                |    1234        |                |                |
    |                |                |                |    1234        |                |                |
    |                |                |                |    45          |                |                |
    |                |                |                |    45          |                |                |
    |                |                |                |    1234        |                |                |
    •----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•----------------•
    

    Remark : This method needs numerous steps, but is quite safe, because all the modifications, produced by the different S/R, concern one line at a time ( or a consecutive block of lines, in regexes A to F ! )

    Of course, on huge files , execution time may be important, but you should get the expected results, at the end ;-))

    Cheers,

    guy038



  • thanks a lot for your effort, but too much fuss, isn’t it?

    vlookup in excel is easier to do I think



  • @patrickdrd said:

    thanks a lot for your effort, but too much fuss, isn’t it?

    NOTHING is too much fuss for @guy038 ! :-D



  • @guy038 said:

    the regex engine ends up , matching, wrongly, all file contents

    As mentioned in this thread, this is in all likelihood caused by this problem.



  • (?-s)^(.+)\R(?s)(?=.*\R\1\R?)

    doesn’t match the whole line,
    e.g. it tells me that adobe.com exists, but I only have lines that end in adobe.com, e.g. get.adobe.com



  • Hi, All,

    Sorry for the delay, but I was busy with some garden work (hedge trimming !) and, of course, I also tested the 6 regex, from A to F, of my previous post !

    I used the following test file :

    a#9999999999
    a#9999999999
    abcdefghij#9999999999
    .........................
    .........................
    ..21524 IDENTICAL lines ( in totality ! )
    .........................  
    .........................  
    abcdefghij#9999999999
    z#9999999999
    z#9999999999
    

    As you can see :

    • It begins with the 2 identical lines a#9999999999

    • Then, followed with 21524 identical lines abcdefghij#9999999999

    • And it finished with the 2 identical lines z#9999999999, followed with a final line-break


    So, I ran the regex C of my previous post, ( (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(\1.*\R)+ ), against this test file

    => It correctly matched the 2 lines, at beginning of file, then the 21524 identical lines ( => a selection of 495,103 characters ) and, the 2 lines at the end of the file

    Then, I simply added ONE additional line abcdefghij#9999999999 to that file and ran the regex again. This time, it matched the 2 lines, at beginning of file, but wrongly grabbed all remaining text ( So the 21525 lines AND the 2 last lines ) !?

    To verify if the results depended of the size of the selection, I changed the test file,with lines of 140 chars, as below :

    a#9999999999
    a#9999999999
    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz#9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
    .........................
    .........................
    ..21524 IDENTICAL lines ( in totality ! )
    .........................  
    .........................  
    abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyzabcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz#9999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999999
    z#9999999999
    z#9999999999
    

    I was very surprised to see that results were exactly the same ( OK for 21524 identical lines and KO for 21525 identical lines !!?? ) And yet, this time, the selection contained 3,013,360 chars !

    Of course, I did this test with all the other regexes. For example, with regex A, the limit is a bit higher : 25120 lines. But again, after adding one more line, the regex A failed :-((

    So, guys, if you don’t mind, I would like you to test the regex C , with the first test file, above, in order to verify if it is “laptop-dependent”. I means, may be, results are not pertinent with my weak Windows XP configuration !?

    In the meanwhile , seemingly, we can conclude that, in a previously sorted file, a regular expression can handle, roughly, not more than 21,000 identical lines, at a time ! I’d be glad to receive your feed-back in order to confirm or invalidate this fact :-))


    Of course, I came to this temporary conclusion, after testing my 6 regexes, from A to F, against real text. I decided to take all contents of a novel, on the Gutenberg site. And…, as I’m French, my choice was, naturally, the novel “The count of Monte-Cristo” by Alexandre Dumas, that you may download from the link below:

    http://www.gutenberg.org/files/1184/1184-0.txt ( Choose the link “Raw text UTF-8” )

    When I first tried to build a suitable sorted working file, in order to test my regexes, unfortunately, all failed :-(( But I also noticed, in that sorted file, that there were numerous lines the#...... Indeed, if you download the novel, just count the occurrences of the regex \bthe\b => 28628 occurrences of the article “the”. So I deleted all these consecutive occurrences of the word “the”. This time all my regexes worked as expected :-))

    However, note that, during my tests, I found out that my regexes D to F were, initially, erroneous. So I changed them, and I already updated my previous post with the correct regexes !


    With the help of that page, below, on the most common words in English :

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_common_words_in_English

    I verified, with the regex \bWord\b, that, in this novel, the 10 most common words used, in the initial text, are :

    the          28,628  ( ABSENT in the SORTED file )
    to           12,897
    of           12,916
    and          12,570
    a             9,473
    I             8,393
    you           8,288
    he            6,945
    in            6,625
    his           5,909
    

    So, we are sure that the 6 regexes can, at least, manage files containing up to 13,000 consecutive identical lines !


    Now, if some people is interested about the different steps, that I used to constitute a decent working file, for testing regexes A to F, just have a glance to the table, below :

    •------------------------------------•---------------•-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------•-------------• 
    |            SEARCH                  |    REPLACE    |                                       EXPLANATIONS                                                  | Occurrences |
    •------------------------------------•---------------•-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------•-------------•
    |                                    |               | We delete, manually, from BEGINNING of file to the END of the CONTENTS part                         |             |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    |                                    |               | We delete, manually, from AFTER the FOOTNOTES part till the VERY END of file                        |             |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | ,(?=\d)                            |    EMPTY      | We delete any COMMA separator in NUMBERS                                                            |       264   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | [,;.]                              | \x20          | We change any punctuation END of a (part of) SENTENCE with a SPACE character                        |    72,423   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?i)o’(?=clock)                    | of\x20the\x20 | We replace the "o’" CONTRACTIVE form with the COMPLETE form "of the "                               |       164   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?i)’s|(?<!\w)’|’(?!\w)            |    EMPTY      | We delete the "’s" string and any "’" sign NOT SURROUNDED with WORD chars                           |     2,754   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?i)(d|l)’                         | \1e\x20       | We change the "d’" and "l’" French CONTRACTIVE forms to, RESPECTIVELY, "de " and "le "              |       311   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | —|-                                | \x20          | We change any HYPHEN-MINUS character as well as the EM DASH char, with a SPACE character            |     4,933   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | [^\w’\r\n ]                        | \x20          | We ONLY keep WORD, SPACE, and EOL characters and the ’ sign( PRESENT in English CONTRACTIVE forms ) |    38,795   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?-i)(?<=\s)(?=\w)[^aAIVX\d](?=\s) | \x20          | As ONE-char STRING, we ONLY keep article "A", "a", pronoun "I", DIGITS and ROMAN letters "V" , "X"  |     1,151   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | ^\h*\R|^\h+|\h+$|\h+(?=\h)         |    EMPTY      | We delete PURE BLANK lines, TRIM spaces at START and END, and REDUCE to a ONE SPACE gap             |   107,108   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | \x20          ( > 1 mn ! )         | \r\n          | Finally, we change any SINGLE SPACE character with a LINE BREAK                                     |   419,769   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | COLUMN editor, with LEADING zeros  |               | At LINE 1, COLUMN 1                                                                                 |             |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?-s)^(\d{6})(.+)                  | \2#\1         | We SWAP each WORD and its REFERENCE number                                                          |   464,233   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | (?i)^the#                          |               | We BOOKMARK all the LINES, containing the article "the", whatever its CASE                          |    28,529   |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | Bookmark > Cut Bookmarked Lines    |               | We BACKUP all these lines in an OTHER file, for FURTHER processing                                  |             |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    | Sort lines Lexico... ASCENDING     |               | => A work SORTED file, encoded UTF-8 with BOM, of 5,861,424 BYTES, with 435,704 WORDS, ONE per line |             |
    |                                    |               |                                                                                                     |             |
    •------------------------------------•---------------•-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------•-------------•
    

    Now, applying the regexes A to F, against the sorted file obtained, I got, after 10s about for each, the coherent results, below :

    
    •-------•---------------------------------------•----------•-------------•--------------•
    | Regex |                SEARCH                 |  REPLACE | Occurrences | LINES Number |
    •-------•---------------------------------------•----------•-------------•--------------•
    |       |    Work SORTED file, obtained, AFTER all the steps above :     |    435,704   |
    •-------•---------------------------------------•----------•-------------•--------------•
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   A   |  (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(?:\1.*\R)+           |  EMPTY   |    10,818   |      6,861   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   B   |  (?-s)^((.+#).*\R)(?:\2.*\R)+         |  \1      |    10,818   |     17,679   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   C   |  (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(\1.*\R)+             |  \2      |    10,818   |     17,679   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   D   |  (?-s)^(.+#).*\R(?:\1.*\R)+|.+\R      |  ?1$0    |    17,679   |    428,843   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   E   |  (?-s)^((.+#).*\R)(?:\2.*\R)+|.+\R    |  \1      |    17,679   |     10,818   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    |   F   |  `(?-s)^(.+#).*\R(\1.*\R)+|.+\R	    |  \2      |    17,679   |     10,818   |
    |       |                                       |          |             |              |
    •-------•---------------------------------------•----------•-------------•--------------•
    

    It’s easy to verify that :

    • 6,861 lines, after regex A + 428,843 lines, after regex D = 435,704 ( Total of the file )

    • 6,861 lines, after regex A, + 10,818 lines, after regex E = 17,679 lines, after regex B

    • 6,861 lines, after regex A, + 10,818 lines, after regex F = 17,679 lines, after regex C

    On the other hand :

    • The 10818 occurrences of regexes A, B and C correspond to all the first/last duplicate lines, as after regexes E or F

    • The 17,679 occurrences of regexes D, E and F correspond to all first/last duplicate lines AND all the uniques lines, too, as after regexes B or C

    Note also that :

    • With the 3 regexes A, B and C, the unique lines, which must be kept, are,simply, not processed by the regexes

    • With the 3 regexes D, E and F, the unique lines, which must be deleted, are matched by the second alternative .+\R of the regexes


    So, guys, as I said, above, I’m looking for the results of your own tests, relative to the biggest block of consecutive identical lines, correctly handled by the six regexes A to F, above, and the test file, below :

    a#9999999999
    a#9999999999
    abcdefghij#9999999999         )
    .....................         )
    .....................         )   HOW MANY lines ? ( THANKS for testing !!)
    .....................         )
    abcdefghij#9999999999         ]
    z#9999999999
    z#9999999999
    

    Best Regards,

    guy038



  • @guy038
    off topic regarding garden work:
    if your garden is as detailed and thorough as everything else you do, i’d gladly invite you to help me out in mine … the amount of daily magnolia leafs to collect is currently killing me this year and i’ve not been able to control my rakes and brooms with an adequate, repeatable regex ;-)



  • (?-s)^(.+#).\R(\1.\R)+ doesn’t work for my case,
    it doesn’t find any occurrences



  • @guy038 said:

    I’m looking for the results of your own tests, relative to the biggest block of consecutive identical lines, correctly handled by the six regexes A to F, above, and the test file, below

    So it might be worth pointing out a good method for creating an arbitrary (i.e., large!) number of the abcdefghij#9999999999 lines in your request.

    Here’s what I would do:

    • put caret on that line in a tab created for the purpose of testing this
    • start macro recording
    • press ctrl+d (to execute the Duplicate Current Line function)
    • stop macro recording
    • go to the Macro menu and choose Run a Macro Multiple Times…
    • fill in the prompt box entries and press Run (to create the desired number of lines)

    To see how many lines of this type you’ve currently got, simply do a literal Count search for abcdefghij#9999999999.



  • @guy038 said:

    So, guys, if you don’t mind, I would like you to test the regex C , with the first test file, above, in order to verify if it is “laptop-dependent”. I means, may be, results are not pertinent with my weak Windows XP configuration !?

    I did this and obtained exactly the same results as you did, @guy038. Specifically, OK with 21524 identical lines, and NOT OK with 21525 identical lines. I tried both the shorter and longer versions of those “middle” lines in the file. All this using Notepad++ 7.2.2, 32-bit. I doubt that any other (reasonable) version of Notepad++ will show different results.



  • @guy038,

    Do you have more to say on this topic? I’m interested…


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