Insert a string after each number of words with conditions



  • @guy038

    I was playing around with this idea and I’m not sure I see the importance of introducing the complication of the “longest word in English” stuff. For example, if I experiment with a variant of the regex that ignores this, I still get nice results:

    Find: (?-s)(.{1,43})\W
    Replace: $1\r\n

    …gives me nice text wrapping after the desired amount of columns.



  • Hi, @abuali-huma, @scott-sumner and @alan-kilborn,

    Alan, looking again to my previous post, you’re absolutely right about it. Can’t understand why I thought that the length of words was so important ! I should have been excessively tired, two days ago ;-))

    So , I’ve just completely updated my previous post, mentioning your contribution to that nicer regex. Thanks for that !


    As for your own S/R, below :

    SEARCH (?-s)(.{1,43})\W

    REPLACE $1\r\n

    It just differs from my last S/R, of my previous post, as it does not take, in account, the final NON-word character, at position 44, in the replacement part !

    Therefore, starting, again, from this part of the license.txt file, below :

    5. You are not required to accept this License, since you have not signed it. However, nothing else grants you permission to modify or distribute the Program or its derivative works. These actions are prohibited by law if you do not accept this License. Therefore, by modifying or distributing the Program (or any work based on the Program), you indicate your acceptance of this License to do so, and all its terms and conditions for copying, distributing or modifying the Program or works based on it.
    

    It would give the same text, without the space character, at the end of all the lines generated :

    5. You are not required to accept this
    License, since you have not signed it.
    However, nothing else grants you permission
    to modify or distribute the Program or its
    derivative works. These actions are
    prohibited by law if you do not accept this
    License. Therefore, by modifying or
    distributing the Program (or any work based
    on the Program), you indicate your
    acceptance of this License to do so, and
    all its terms and conditions for copying,
    distributing or modifying the Program or
    works based on it.
    

    Cheers,

    guy038



  • @guy038

    Yes, in playing around with your original regex, I didn’t worry about the resulting space at the end of the line, as I have my “save” shortcut mapped to “trim trailing spaces” + “save”. The ONLY way files should be saved (for me!).



  • @guy038

    And it is great that you have Admin rights here and can edit old posts, but I’m neutral on this. I think that old posts should not be edited and clarifying posts should just be added on. It is difficult to follow sometimes when history is CHANGED rather than simply CORRECTED/CLARIFIED later. :-D



  • Hi, Alan,

    Yes, you’re right about it : I should have created a new post with the corrections, for a better history ! It’s just that my updated post was, still, quite long and I thought it would be more clear to, simply, change my initial post. But, I do understand your point of view !

    Cheers,

    guy038



  • @Scott-Sumner
    Thanks for the info!



  • Hello, @hu-ma and All

    To complete the @scott-sumner post, about the two syntaxes of the searched groups, in replacement :

    • \N, with 0 < N < 10

    • $N, with 0 <= N < 2,147,483,648

    There is the other practical syntax, below :

    • ${N}, with 0 <= N < 2,147,483,648

    Indeed, let’s imagine the original text:

    abcd
    1234
    WXYZ
    

    and the first S/R :

    SEARCH ^.(..).

    REPLACE $100|

    You obtain the simple text :

    |
    |
    |
    

    Why ?! Just because, in replacement, the regex engine is looking for the group $100, which, obviously, does not exist ! So, the regex engine rewrites a zero-length string, for the non-existent group 100, followed by the literal character | !

    Now, compare, with the second S/R, below :

    SEARCH ^.(..).

    REPLACE ${1}00|

    This time, you, correctly, get the text, below :

    bc00|
    2300|
    XY00|
    

    => All the changed lines begin by the second and third characters of the original lines of text ( $1 ), and are, simply, followed by the string 00|

    Best Regards,

    guy038



    • Sorry for pumping up old thread, but my issue is related to this one.

    Cutting to the thread…
    Look at Result#2 with desired arrangement

    -Example# 2
    Greetings My Liege! As your personal advisor [NEWLINE] , I am qualified to assist you in all[NEWLINE] matters related to ruling our civilization.[NEWLINE] I am at your service.
    
    --------
    +Seeked arrangement
    I am at your service. [NEWLINE] matters related to ruling our civilization.[NEWLINE], I am qualified to assist you in all[NEWLINE]Greetings My Liege! As your personal advisor
    

    I asked before for a way to rearrange the groups between [NEWLINE] to be backward… Now I’m asking for the same but in more automated way…

    Because not all lines have the same amount of Groups, I want to arrange all the lines that contains Groups between [NEWLINE] to be backward arrangement.

    -Example#3 Contains SIX groups
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six
    
    -------
    +Seeked arrangement
     six[NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE]One
    

    While using the same regex or python script

    -Example#4 Contains 4 groups 
    I want [NEWLINE] this [NEWLINE] to be  [NEWLINE] last
    
    ------
    +Seeked arrangement
     last[NEWLINE] to be [NEWLINE] this [NEWLINE]I want 
    


  • Hi, @abuali-huma,

    I found a general method, which uses three consecutive S/R. We’ll need two dummy characters, NOT used in the current file. I, personally, chose the # and @ characters, but any other may be used !

    • The first S/R :

      • Changes any string [NEWLINE], possibly preceded and/or followed with a space character, by the dummy character #

      • Adds, also, a # character at the end of any non-blank line

    • The second S/R is the main S/R, which rewrites the different parts, between the # character, in reverse order.

      • Note that this S/R will have to be performed as many times, till the message Replace All: 0 occurrences were replaced occurs, in the Replace dialog

      • The general idea, about this S/R, is to switch the beginning and ending parts of the found text, adding a @ character, at the end of the exchanged parts, in order that the next run of this S/R, will avoid these moved parts of text ! Hence, the decreasing number of occurrences found, till zero :-))

    • The Third S/R :

      • Changes the # character, possibly preceded by a @ character, inside text, by the string [NEXLINE], preceded and followed with a space character

      • Deletes the # character, possibly preceded by a @ character, when located at the end of the lines

    All these S/R will use the Regular expression search mode, the Wrap around option and the Replace All button, of the Replace dialog

    So, let’s start with the original text, below :

    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] ten [NEWLINE] eleven [NEWLINE] twelve
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] ten [NEWLINE] eleven
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] ten
    Other text NOT concerned
    by this Search Replacement
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] nine
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] eight
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] seven
    Bla bla blah
    Bla bla blah
    Bla bla blah
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] six
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] five
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] four
    Dummy text
    inserted, in between !
    One [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] three
    One [NEWLINE] two
    One
    I want [NEWLINE] this [NEWLINE] to be  [NEWLINE] last
    

    After running the following S/R , once :

    SEARCH (?-s)\x20?[NEWLINE]\x20?|(?<=.)$

    REPLACE #

    You should get the text, below :

    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#eight#nine#ten#eleven#twelve#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#eight#nine#ten#eleven#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#eight#nine#ten#
    Other text NOT concerned#
    by this Search Replacement#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#eight#nine#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#eight#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#seven#
    Bla bla blah#
    Bla bla blah#
    Bla bla blah#
    One#two#three#four#five#six#
    One#two#three#four#five#
    One#two#three#four#
    Dummy text#
    inserted, in between !#
    One#two#three#
    One#two#
    One#
    I want#this#to be #last#
    

    After running the following S/R, SEVEN times, one after another :

    SEARCH (?-s)([^@#\r\n]+?)#(.+#)?([^@#\r\n]+)#

    REPLACE \3@#\2\1@#

    The modified text is, now :

    twelve@#eleven@#ten@#nine@#eight@#seven@#six@#five@#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    eleven@#ten@#nine@#eight@#seven@#six#five@#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    ten@#nine@#eight@#seven@#six@#five@#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    Other text NOT concerned#
    by this Search Replacement#
    nine@#eight@#seven@#six@#five#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    eight@#seven@#six@#five@#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    seven@#six@#five@#four#three@#two@#One@#
    Bla bla blah#
    Bla bla blah#
    Bla bla blah#
    six@#five@#four@#three@#two@#One@#
    five@#four@#three#two@#One@#
    four@#three@#two@#One@#
    Dummy text#
    inserted, in between !#
    three@#two#One@#
    two@#One@#
    One#
    last@#to be @#this@#I want@#
    

    Seven consecutive runs of that regex S/R are required, to get the sought text :

    • Run 1 : 12 occurrences replaced
    • Run 2 : 10 occurrences replaced
    • Run 3 : 7 occurrences replaced
    • Run 4 : 5 occurrences replaced
    • Run 5 : 3 occurrences replaced
    • Run 6 : 1 occurrences replaced
    • Run 7 : 0 occurrences replaced

    Note : After each run, you may hit the Find Next button, before hitting the Replace All button, to guess the general process !

    The part [^@#\r\n], in the searched regex, represents any single character, different from @, #, \n and \r


    Then, after running the last S/R, once :

    SEARCH (?-s)(@?#)(?=.)|@?#

    REPLACE ?1\x20[NEWLINE]\x20

    We obtain our final text :

    twelve [NEWLINE] eleven [NEWLINE] ten [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    eleven [NEWLINE] ten [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    ten [NEWLINE] nine [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    Other text NOT concerned
    by this Search Replacement
    nine [NEWLINE] eight [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    eight [NEWLINE] seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    seven [NEWLINE] six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    Bla bla blah
    Bla bla blah
    Bla bla blah
    six [NEWLINE] five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    five [NEWLINE] four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    four [NEWLINE] three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    Dummy text
    inserted, in between !
    three [NEWLINE] two [NEWLINE] One
    two [NEWLINE] One
    One
    last [NEWLINE] to be  [NEWLINE] this [NEWLINE] I want
    

    The search part looks for the regex @?#, either, inside the lines ( case group 1 defined ) or at end of lines ( case NO group 1 )

    The replacement part means that, IF group 1 exists, the searched text is replaced by the string [NEWLINE], surrounded by space characters, ELSE NO replacement occurs

    Et voilà !

    Best Regards,

    guy038



  • Thanks very much!
    But just to be clear, in the first regex

    SEARCH (?-s)\x20?[NEWLINE]\x20?|(?<=.)$

    REPLACE #

    Removing the value ** \x20** will result this
    SEARCH (?-s)?[NEWLINE]?|(?<=.)$

    Which will result capturing the space “if available” before and after [NEWLINE] string in first and last group?



  • I found out the removing the \x20 does what I described… Thanks again



  • I modified the original Search regex, as it catches some Unicode characters with will break the line in a middle of a word. So in the modified regex I replace \W with \x20 (space character)… so far no word breaking issues
    Here is the modified one
    (?-s).{1,44}(?=\x20)


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